TIP

Five outstanding projects from across campus have been selected as winners of the annual Provost's Teaching Innovation Prize (TIP). You can learn more about these projects at the opening to the 2017 Enriching Scholarship conference. At 10:00am on Monday, May 1, in the Michigan Union's Rogel Ballroom, Vice Provost James Hilton will present the winning projects. Prior to the ceremony, a 9:00am poster fair and strolling breakfast in the same location offer the U-M community a chance to meet the faculty teams behind the TIP projects, as well as teams that have conducted projects through the Investigating Student Learning grant funded by CRLT and the Office of the Vice Provost for Global Engagement and Interdisciplinary Academic Affairs. Registration is appreciated.

headshots of faculty winners of the Provost's Teaching Innovatin Prize

This year's winning projects include: Read more »

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3 people discussing a posterAt the kickoff event of this year's Enriching Scholarship conference, Vice Provost James Hilton awarded the 2015 Provost's Teaching Innovation Prize (TIP) to five outstanding teaching projects here at the University of Michigan. As Hilton explained, TIP "recognizes the creation of engaging and authentic experiences that fully tap the rich resources of U-M’s residential setting."

This year's projects all emphasized that "learning is often about doing." Hilton remarked, "From community and campus engagement to the application of new technology tools, these winning projects challenge students to actively apply what they’re learning to real situations that can be much messier than those described in textbooks. In the process, students learn to collaborate and think critically, often across disciplinary boundaries."

This year's winning projects include: Read more »

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2014 TIP Winning Innovation, Trailblazing With Wikipedia: Improving Student Learning and Easing Implementation.

 

 

  Read more »

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2014 TIP Winning Innovation, Doing Science Firsthand Through Dorm-Room Labs.

 

 

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2014 TIP Winning Innovation, Dropping Lecture and Summative Exams to Accelerate Deep Learning.

 

 

 

Picture a section of 60 engineering students working in 12 groups, each with its own whiteboard. Prior to class, everyone has carefully read the assigned text and marked it up with social annotation software developed at MIT. After individuals bring homework solutions to class, each group strives for up to 90 minutes to create a superior, collective response. Almost as much time is then spent analyzing differences between the best solution and one’s initial effort: distinguishing conceptual from procedural errors, rating overall understanding, listing areas that need review, and assessing other group members. Grades reflect working really hard and being honest about effort, rather than punishing mistakes.

No one is checking Facebook, and the room is buzzing with energy. When groups hit a roadblock, they appreciate quick and direct access to an instructional aide (an undergraduate who recently took the course), a graduate student instructor, or the professor.

This course, MSE 220, Introduction to Materials and Manufacturing, is open for any U-M faculty to visit, just as Yalisove was able to learn about these pedagogies through multiple visits to the Harvard physics classroom of Eric Mazur, the founder of Peer Instruction.

In 2015, this course will be scaled up for 200+ students by holding it in the newly renovated Pierpont Commons cafeteria.

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