Grants

Funded Projects
Faculty Development Fund (FDF)
Project Title Overview of the Project
Empowering Educators: The MENTOR Series
Daniel Cronin
Medical School
Michelle Daniel
Medical School
Seetha Monrad
Medical School
Gurjit Sandhu
Medical School
Vineet Chopra
Medical School
Robert Dickson
Medical School

Medical School
Amit Gupta
Medical School
Nathan Houchens
Medical School
Sanjay Saint
Medical School
Jakob McSparron
Medical School
Janet Biermann
Medical School

Medical School

Medical School
Patricia Mullan
Medical School
Michael Englesbe
Medical School

$6500.00

Historically, medical students at the University of Michigan Medical School have had limited educator preparedness training. This is unfortunate as once medical students graduate they have significant responsibilities teaching co-residents and the next generation of medical students. Although a teaching elective does exist within the medical school, it is not scalable and not suited to practice clinical teaching. This grant team seeks to create a new “Clinical Teaching Elective” which will be scalable and flexible, allowing senior medical students to learn core teaching principles and skills while simultaneously being immersed in clinical practice. To accomplish this, our grant team is developing a central repository of best teaching practices that can be used as a curricular tool and on-demand teacher’s guide, the Medical Educators Novel Teaching On-demand Resource (MENTOR) Series, which is comprised of primarily concise educational videos supplemented by summary infographics. Importantly, select videos will also be used futuristically to fill gaps in other areas of the medical school curriculum. The creation team is composed of a diverse group of education experts from various departments and divisions, who are involved in content creation, design, evaluation and implementation. To ensure that our resource is optimally created for a variety of learning styles and preferences, we will be obtaining iterative feedback from medical student group interviews. The grant money will be used to fund food for medical student group interviews, as well as costs of video and infographic production including editing videos, script styles, animations and graphics based off medical student feedback.

Coloring Science

$10000.00

A key factor influencing academic and career choices by undergraduate students is the presence of role models. These role models can be the faculty and graduate student instructors that teach them, but also the scientists that are highlighted in the textbooks and lectures. Currently, there is lack of geographic, ethnic, and racial diversity of these potential role models present in course materials. This is due to the combination of historic and current opportunity gaps, bias in selection by publishers that typically stick to the classic examples, and shortfalls in crediting of past scientific contributions by scientists belonging to such underrepresented groups. In this proposal, we aim to develop a resource that can be used in the main introductory gateway classes to the various biology majors, with the goal to increase the diversity of presented role models to approximately 5,500 students per year. This resource will consist of a collection of lecture slides pertaining to the core concepts taught in these classes, highlighting the key work contributed by scientists of color.
New English Language Institute Undergraduate English for Academic Purposes Curriculum

$10000.00

The English Language Institute (ELI), an LSA program which provides English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses and co-curricular learning opportunities to international graduate students, has been charged with developing undergraduate courses and co-curricular offerings. Since 2013, the almost 2000 international undergraduate students at U-M have had no access to EAP instruction. This faculty group has been tasked with designing a cutting-edge undergraduate EAP curriculum that reflects the latest research on EAP instruction to engage diverse international undergraduates across the University of Michigan. These courses will be carefully crafted to meet the specific reading, writing, speaking, and listening needs of international undergraduates on U-M’s Ann Arbor campus. They will be supplemented with co-curricular offerings, including one-to-one language studio consultations, EAP workshops, and an online pre-arrival course. We will also develop concrete plans for coordination and collaboration with stakeholder units. The FDF-funded portion of our work will begin with a Spring 2020 retreat during which the findings from data collected and analyzed in the prior year and outlines for prospective courses will be reviewed. We will then move on to creating detailed syllabi and teaching materials for specific courses and co-curricular offerings. The overarching goal is to provide comprehensive language, academic, and intercultural support that will ensure the success of every international student on campus.
Building a Platform for Live, Individualized Feedback During In-Class Programming Exercises
James Juett
Engineering
John Kloosterman
Engineering
Amir Kamil
Engineering

$5991.00

In several of our introductory programming courses (ENGR 101, EECS 183, and EECS 280), we engage students during lecture in code writing exercises supported by a web-based code editor and program visualization tool called "Lobster". We propose additional features we would like to add to Lobster to improve feedback students receive on exercises, provide checkpoints as they work toward a solution, and create an instructor dashboard for tracking students' progress in real-time. These additional features will enable new modes of teaching and learning in the classroom and improve instructor-student interaction. Our plan initially targets in-class exercises in ENGR 101, EECS 183, and EECS 280. Improvements to these courses will impact a large number of students - during the year 2018, they had a combined enrollment of nearly 5,400 students. We plan to hire a UM student as a developer to implement this work.

Lobster is currently used by only about half of the instructors who regularly teach ENGR 101, EECS 183, and EECS 280. We expect more fully featured exercises in Lobster and improved feedback for students and instructors will lead more instructors will adopt Lobster for exercises in their lectures, and we will use the adoption rate as one of our evaluation metrics. We will also obtain multi source feedback from students and instructors to evaluate how the improved version of Lobster compares to the current implementation. We will use the Winter 2020 term as a control and test the newly implemented Lobster features in Fall 2020.
Designing and Implementing a Structured Process and Task Trainer for Teaching Digital Vaginal Examination in Labor
John DeLancey
Medical School
Joanne Bailey
Medical School
Helen Morgan
Medical School

$10000.00

In maternity care, it is essential that nurses, midwives and physicians have the skills needed to evaluate progress during labor. Digital vaginal examination (VE) during labor is an essential skill for students to master, but one that is challenging to teach and practice in the simulated clinical setting. Affordable, realistic simulators are not currently available and standardized patients cannot be utilized to simulate labor and birth. Because VE during labor can be uncomfortable and intrusive, it is imperative that students are prepared prior to clinical so they can perform VE in a way that causes the least discomfort while at the same time correctly assessing for labor progress. In a collaborative effort between midwifery faculty, obstetrics/gynecology, and engineering, we propose to: (a) develop and evaluate a structured step-wise process for teaching VE (b) design, build, and evaluate a realistic vaginal examination task trainer that can be utilized for nursing, midwifery and medical education and (c) evaluate the effectiveness of both the educational approach and the task trainer using a three armed, pretest-posttest design with midwifery and medical students as participants.
Using 3-D printed anatomical models of specimens from the Museum of Zoology Research Collections to transform experiential learning in six vertebrate biodiversity laboratory courses

$10000.00

A grant from CRLT will enhance lecture materials and laboratory exercises in six vertebrate biodiversity classes through the use of 3-D printed anatomical models made from images generated with X-ray computed tomography (CT). Recent access to CT is made possible through the acquisition and installation of a Nikon X-ray CT scanner in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. The scanner is located at the Research Museums Center in close proximity to > 4 million specimens of fishes, reptiles, amphibians, birds and mammals including an extraordinary collection of fluid-preserved specimens, all housed in the Museum of Zoology (UMMZ). The ability to generate CT images and produce models of both hard and soft anatomy from valuable fluid preserved research specimens, using noninvasive techniques, will provide opportunities for students to engage with the great diversity of vertebrate form and function. For example, students will be exposed to the differences in internal anatomy such as the windpipes of cranes that are coiled to amplify sound. Printing models at magnification will provide opportunities to compare small anatomical structures such as the pharyngeal jaws or gill arches of fishes or the bones of a snake skull. Students will use models to articulate entire skeletons or assemble and disassemble bones of the skull and other structures. These self-guided activities of discovery and research will provide a better, more intuitive understanding of species diversity and variation with less memorization.
Compassionate Conversations Curriculum for Michigan Medicine: Building a core communication curriculum for medical students, postgraduates, and faculty
Michael Mendez
Medical School
Nathan Houchens
Medical School
John Osterholzer
Medical School

$10000.00

Ineffective physician communication leads to increased stress for families related to treatment decisions and the condition of patients. Many families do not understand basic information about their loved ones’ illnesses and treatments, and physicians frequently miss opportunities to address family concerns and attend to family emotions. While communication guides and conversation roadmaps have been published, Michigan Medicine lacks a program common to medical students, post-graduate trainees and faculty that provides our trainees the necessary communication skills and practical tools to navigate these conversations. CRLT funding will provide key support to assist the program in its initial phase of growth.

This proposal describes the development of a dynamic family meeting simulation model that engages learners with improvisational actors and highly trained faculty-facilitators in a manner that optimizes achievement of the following goals:

1) To develop a sustainable communication training program that enhances the ability of trainees to compassionately and effectively conduct conversations which identify the values, goals, and life-sustaining treatment decisions of patients with serious illness.
2) To recruit and train communication education champions to create a network of Compassionate Conversation Facilitators at Michigan Medicine
Vocal Health Lab, Somatic Bodywork & Curriculum Development for the Contemporary Musical Theatre Performer
Catherine A. Walker
Music, Theatre & Dance

$10000.00

This 3-tiered initiative will enhance the curriculum and training of the musical theatre majors as well as provide professional development for faculty members in the Musical Theatre, Theatre & Voice Departments. The Musical Theatre department remains committed to providing a comprehensive, cutting-edge, holistic, approach to training today’s performers.Part One: New Vocal Health Lab - Musical Theatre students will have regular access to Voice Specialist, Marci Rosenberg (CCC-SLP). Musical theatre performers are at greater risk for developing voice disorders. Even a minor voice disorder can have a significant impact on the performer. The Vocal Health Lab will offer specialized care and training for the students who regularly sing using a high vocal load and become proactive at detecting emerging problems. Part Two: Alexander Technique Somatic Training - By training both faculty and students to optimize posture and alignment, the functionality of the voice will improve. Additionally, Alexander Technique has been shown to reduce stress and improve overall well-being; essential for Musical Theatre performers. Part Three: Professional development for faculty in the Musical Theatre, Theatre and Voice Departments - Tom Burke, a New York based, voice teacher, speech language pathologist and cutting-edge voice researcher will present a workshop for faculty and students. In addition, Catherine Walker will continue pursuing certification as an Estill Course Instructor with Mr. Burke. This training is in alignment with the department’s current voice curriculum. Ms. Walker will also be able to offer voice training workshops to secondary music educators as a service beyond the University community.