Online Resources for Piano Literature

Online Resources for Piano Literature

Academic Year:
2017 - 2018 (June 1, 2017 through May 31, 2018)
Funding Requested:
$500.00
Project Dates:
-
Applicant(s):
Chair Uniqname:
Overview of the Project:
I have been developing educational enrichment materials on the piano, its repertoire, and its culture. This project aims to utilize the power of the web to present information in an engaging way that is easily accessible and connects musicians with materials for further study in performance, analysis and interpretation. In the summer of 2017, one set of videos about the solo piano mazurka genre and another set about the piano music of Bela Bartók were filmed at the Duderstadt Digital Media Center (DMC).
The content of both sets of videos highlights relationships between art music, folk music and dance. Although these topics are fundamental to understanding the inspiration behind this music, they are typically understood only at a superficial level. In an online educational video form, conversations, performances of art, folk, and dance music, dance steps, musical scores, and textual overlay can all be combined into one powerful integrated learning experience.
Our videos on the mazurka genre and on the music of Bartók are the first of their kind. They have the potential to become a primary, or first-stop resource to learn about one of the dominant dance forms of the 19th century, and about one of the early 20th century’s leading modernists. They should be of great interest to all pianists and pedagogues, and highly useful for private piano instruction, as well as courses in piano literature, musicology, dance, and Slavic studies, among others.
Number of Graduate Students Affected Annually:
35 graduate students
Number of Undergraduate Students Affected Annually:
35 undergraduate students
Budget Administrator:
Megan McClure, mcmegan@umich.edu and Tony Arterberry, aart@umich.edu
Final Report Fields
Project Objectives:
The project is designed to provide enrichment materials on the piano repertoire, enlivening the learning experience by combining commentary, performances, and visual aids as only a video format can. I intend for these videos to be used both in Piano Literature and Musicology classes, as well as by piano teachers as lesson supplements.
Project Achievements:
With the helpful assistance of this grant, the project is nearing an important milestone, which is the publication of a group of videos onto YouTube that is crosslinked onto the SMTD Piano department website on my own studio page and onto the pages of the other faculty collaborators. I have already assigned the early versions of these videos to a doctoral seminar in Romantic music on the subject of Chopin mazurkas, and I received expressions of interest; some students watched much more than they were assigned. I will continue to use them for that purpose and others.
Continuation:
Yes, there was a substantial amount of footage, and there remain several videos where editing remains incomplete, and others where it is barely underway. I'd like to finish these projects also at a later date, en route to the further expansion of this resource.
Dissemination:
YouTube videos, linked to the SMTD Piano Department website and advertised to colleagues and students, and the piano community.
Advice to your Colleagues:
Videos are powerful learning tools, but they are very complex logistically. It took longer to get them together than I had expected. I highly recommend generous budgeting for a student editor who is reliable and a good communicator. Check references carefully and be picky about those issues. I worked with prompt editors and others who were unpredictable and it made a huge difference, much more than did their technical capabilities. Really useful resources for such projects are the Screen Arts department and the Copyright Office.