Sessions

CRLT Players sessions explore a range of topics related to advancing equity in higher education spaces. While the specifics change from session to session, all CRLT Players work contains topic-specific framing and/or research; a theatrical intervention; and facilitated participant discussion, exploration, and reflection on what individuals and institutions can do to meet the concerns raised in the session. Sessions vary in length but the majority are 90 minutes to 2 hours.

Please contact us to start planning your event.

7 into 15

A high-energy, interactive performance that can be adapted to address a range of topics.

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7 into 15

Act for Equity [VIRTUAL OFFERING]

Participants take part in a sequenced experience designed for new faculty and graduate student instructors to reflect on their ability to teach equitably and inclusively in the current moment.

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Image from "Act for Equity" Presentation

Chair's Role in Faculty Mentoring

Fashioned as three thematically related vignettes, this performance explores the chair's role in faculty mentoring.

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Chair's Role in Faculty Mentoring

Conflict in the Classroom

Focuses on a conversation between students that moves quickly from civil dialogue to charged argument.

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Conflict in the Classroom

Faculty Advising Faculty

Explores the ways in which senior faculty members mentor their junior colleagues and considers the differing relationships and professional outcomes that can result from these processes.

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Faculty Advising Faculty

Faculty Meeting: Navigating Departmental Politics

A richly layered sketch that can be productively used to focus on two issues important to any university: faculty hiring and departmental climate.

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Faculty Meeting: Navigating Departmental Politics

Great Expectations: Mentoring Graduate Students

Explores common tensions that can arise between advisors and their advisees.

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Great Expectations: Mentoring Graduate Students

It's in the Syllabus and Other First Generation College Student Experiences

An immersive, playfully disorienting encounter that offers participants a complex view of a heterogenous identity group: students who are the first generation in their family to attend college.

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FGCS

Managing Mentoring: Cultivating Successful Mentoring Relationships in STEM Labs

Provides an in-depth examination of multiple mentoring interactions occurring in a lab group. The session interweaves facilitated discussion with a theatrical case study depicting exchanges between graduate students, a postdoc, and a PI.

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Managing Mentoring: Cultivating Successful Mentoring Relationships in STEM Labs

Moving the Needle: Creating a Climate Resistant to Sexual Harassment

Building on introductory conversations about the prevalence and consequences of sexual harassment on individuals and communities in higher education, attendees analyze an embodied case study and then participate in facilitated design-thinking exercises targeted at effecting change.

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climate

Moving the Needle: Enacting Your Personal Responsibility

Aims to support academic units in developing a critical mass of individuals who have the willingness and skill to productively address sexual harassment when it occurs in their communities.

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enacting

Moving the Needle: Shifting the Conversation around Sexual Harassment

Challenges participants to expand their understanding of what sexual harassement is, how it impacts individuals and communities, and what makes an environment ripe for its presence

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shifting

Tenure Decisions

Considers the common interpersonal dynamics and structural challenges that can undermine a fair tenure process and encourages participants to think about their own responsibilities to supporting fair tenure deliberations.

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Tenure Decisions

You Don't Belong Here [VIRTUAL OFFERING]

This session centers around an embodied case study depicting one woman’s reflections on her experiences of higher education and her interactions with a range of systems that sent a persistent message that she didn’t belong, that she would never truly be a part of her university community.

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Image from "You Don't Belong Here" presentation

​​​​Shoulda, Woulda, Coulda [VIRTUAL OFFERING]

Systems of higher education in the U.S. create differential advantage and disadvantage for the people who work and learn in them. When individuals move through these systems--as administrators, instructors, or learners--they make choices to participate in the perpetuation or the disruption of these inequities.

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Image from "Shoulda, Woulda, Coulda" presentation