CRLT understands that the pandemic has made managing the demands of both family care and work responsibilities especially challenging. For many of us that means needing to step away from a Zoom meeting or having children appear on camera when they need to talk to us during a meeting. We understand that this is a part of worklife during the pandemic, and we want to reassure you that we understand and that this should not be a barrier to your participation in our events.
Dates Title Details
10/6/22 11:30 am - 10/6/22 1:00 pm Begin with a Problem: Using Inductive Learning to Engage STEM Students

Session Format: Hybrid (Synchronous In Person or Remote simultaneously)

Intended Audience: Faculty, Graduate Students, Postdocs, UG Instructional Assistants

Session Abstract: In traditional approaches, instructors present general, theoretical concepts first, solve example problems next, and leave applications for students to solve during homework. Inductive learning turns that sequence around. Starting with a problem or question serves to engage students, and motivate learning the concepts and techniques. In this session, you will examine examples of inductive learning strategies. You will then have an opportunity to consider how to apply them in your own classroom.

10/7/22 9:00 am - 10/7/22 11:00 am Effective Group Work (Faculty only)

Session Format: Remote synchronous (Zoom)

Intended Audience: Faculty

Session Abstract: What makes group work effective? This interactive session will provide an overview of approaches to collaborative group work and consider design and assessment strategies that can help ensure that all students are engaged, included, and successful in groups.

10/7/22 1:00 pm - 10/7/22 3:00 pm Effective Group Work (Graduate students & Postdocs)

Session Format: Remote synchronous (Zoom)

Intended Audience: Graduate Students, Postdocs

Session Abstract: What makes group work effective? This interactive session will provide an overview of approaches to collaborative group work and consider design and assessment strategies that can help ensure that all students are engaged, included, and successful in groups.

10/13/22 10:00 am - 10/13/22 12:00 pm Introduction to Equity-focused Teaching

Session Format: Remote Synchronous (Zoom)

Intended Audience: Faculty, Graduate Students, Postdocs

Session Abstract: How can instructors deliberately cultivate learning environments (F2F and remote) where all students are valued, respected, and supported in their learning? This interactive synchronous session will introduce participants to CRLT’s research-based framework for equity-focused teaching, provide structured opportunities for instructors to reflect on their goals and practices related to equity, consider how to apply key research-based teaching principles to their teaching, and exchange ideas with colleagues to support the deliberate cultivation of equitable learning environments. This session will be especially helpful for instructors who are relatively new to thinking about equity in the teaching and learning space.

10/17/22 2:00 pm - 10/17/22 3:00 pm Group Work Exchange (Faculty only)

Session Format: Remote synchronous (Zoom)

Intended Audience: Faculty

Session Abstract: This session is intended for faculty who attended the “Effective Group Work” session on October 7, 2022. Are you ready to (re) design group work for your courses? Would it be helpful to circulate draft group work design plans and receive feedback from peers? If the answer to both questions is yes, then sign-up for a group work exchange. To participate, you will need to have a draft group assignment that is ready to share.

10/18/22 2:00 pm - 10/18/22 3:00 pm Group Work Exchange (Faculty only)

Session Format: In-Person

Intended Audience: Faculty

Session Abstract: This session is intended for faculty who attended the “Effective Group Work” session on October 7, 2022. Are you ready to (re) design group work for your courses? Would it be helpful to circulate draft group work design plans and receive feedback from peers? If the answer to both questions is yes, then sign-up for a group work exchange. To participate, you will need to have a draft group assignment that is ready to share.

10/26/22 1:00 pm - 10/26/22 2:30 pm Using the Power of Teams to Drive Learning

Session Format: In-person

Intended Audience: Faculty, Graduate Students, Postdocs, Academic Staff

Session Abstract: Team-based learning (TBL) is a structured form of small-group learning that emphasizes student preparation out of class and application of knowledge in class. In this session, a team of instructors from the University of Michigan School of Dentistry and Medical School as well as the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, will introduce participants to the foundational principles of TBL including peer evaluations, goal setting and self-reflection. Our team has implemented TBL in a second-year dental diagnostic sciences course since 2018.

Participants will learn the basic elements of TBL, strategies for implementation, and ways to support and assess student learning in the TBL classroom. The team will also provide guidance and present data on peer evaluation, goal setting, and self-reflection in the context of TBL. This session is recommended for instructors who:

  • are beginning to explore TBL
  • are considering TBL for their upcoming courses
  • are currently using TBL but would like to explore strategies for peer feedback and how to guide learners in self-reflection and goal setting in their courses
10/28/22 10:00 am - 10/28/22 11:30 am Understanding How Stereotype Threat, Impostor Syndrome, and Growth Mindset Affect Student Learning

Session Format: In Person

Intended Audience: Faculty, Graduate Students, Postdocs, UG Instructional Assistants, Admin/Staff

Session Abstract: Research shows that when students worry about fulfilling a negative stereotype related to certain social identities, it can hurt their learning (a phenomenon known as stereotype threat). Research also shows that an instructor’s beliefs about their own and their students’ intelligence and ability impact the classroom environment. In this interactive session, participants will reflect on instructor and student social identities and learn about strategies for mitigating stereotype threat, impostor syndrome, and encouraging a growth mindset for students in their classes.

11/4/22 10:30 am - 11/4/22 12:30 pm Facilitating Discussions of Research Literature in STEM

Session Format: Remote Synchronous (Zoom)

Intended Audience: Faculty, Graduate Students, Postdocs

Session Abstract: This workshop provides an opportunity for instructors in STEM courses to discuss evidence-based practices that can promote more effective discussions of research literature. Through a series of group-based activities, instructors will consider methods for helping students effectively engage with readings ahead of class and facilitate productive discussions that include all students. This workshop will be most helpful to instructors who plan to mostly discuss research literature in class and less useful to those running textbook-based or problem-based courses.

11/11/22 2:00 pm - 11/11/22 4:00 pm How Do We Begin: A Historical Reckoning with Anti-Black Racism at U-M

Session Format: Remote synchronous (Zoom)

Intended Audience: Faculty, Graduate Students, Postdocs, UG Instructional Assistants, Admin/Staff

Session Abstract: Written by guest playwright and U-M alumn Jordan Harris, this short series of plays illuminates U-M’s complicated relationship to elitism and racial inequity. Using Matthew Johnson’s book Undermining Racial Justice (a historical analysis of the admissions processes at U-M) as an entry point, the play examines how American colleges and universities–and U-M specifically–have perpetuated anti-Blackness while simultaneously benefiting from their association with inclusive values. Through a series of facilitated discussion and activities, participants will wrestle with a central question: with an understanding of our inequitable past and present, how will we imagine and pursue a racially just future?